Lessons From The Sukkah – One Christian’s Perspective

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Lessons From The Sukkah – One Christian’s Perspective

You can learn many lessons from the sukkah. A few are:
(1) We are strangers in this land.
(2) This world is not our permanent home-it is only temporary.
(3) Any time God’s people become comfortable where they are at it spells problems.
(4) We must be able to move when God moves.
(5) We must not close God out.

1 Peter 2:11 NKJV
“Beloved, I beg you as sojourners and pilgrims, abstain from fleshly lusts which war against the soul”

As people in a land temporary, we must not hold on to things too tightly. Things control and manipulate us. Things can become our gods (idols) when we begin to hold on to them too tightly. When things become your god, you turn away from the only true and living God. God gave the Feast of Tabernacle as a reminder to the people of who He is. We need to seek God’s kingdom, not earthly comfort. As we seek first the kingdom of God, our material needs are provided for by the Lord.

Luke 12:31 NKJV
“But seek the kingdom of God, and all these things shall be added to you”

When the Israelites were wanderers in the desert they all lived in tents. It did not matter if you were rich or poor. During sukkot all men are equal before God and one another. Each one sits in his flimsy sukkah and considers God, not his own status. The Feast of Tabernacles give a person an opportunity to reflect on God’s great love and majesty, and how they treat others. The tabernacle (sukkah) is a flimsy tent where you reflect on God’s majesty. We too are flimsy tabernacles that should reflect God’s majesty.

We must be able to move when God moves. We should not get so involved with things of the world that it prevents us from moving when God tells us to. The tabernacle (sukkah) is a flimsy structure and can be taken down and put up in a very short period of time. It is sensitive to the wind, just as we are to be sensitive to the Holy Spirit.

The sukkah is open to the heavens–it cannot be closed off. We too are to be open to God. We should never close God out of our lives.

Amos 9:11 NKJV
“On that day I will raise up the tabernacle of David, which has fallen down. And repair its damages; I will raise up its ruins; and rebuild it as in the days of old”

The Tabernacle of David was a flimsy tent where glorious worship and fellowship with God took place. It may have been fragile and unsightly, but it enabled the Israelites to look out the door and see the glory of the Lord hovering over them.

Throughout Christian history, many great revivals were held in tents and brush arbors closely resembling the sukkah (tabernacle).

Isaiah 64:6 NKJV
“But we are all like an unclean thing, And all our righteousnesses are like filthy rags; we all fade as a leaf, and our iniquities, like the wind have taken us away”

When the sukkah is first put up it is fresh and green. As the days of the Feast of Tabernacles progresses, the leaves begin to dry. Soon they are falling as the wind blows. Our life here is short, but our hope is not in this world. God has provided a better place for the believers.

John 14:2-3 NKJV
“In My Father’s house are many mansions; if it were not so, I would have told you. I go to prepare a place for you. And if I go and prepare a place for you, I will come again and receive you to Myself; that where I am, there you may be also”

Inside of our houses it is easy to begin to feel permanent and self-sufficient and lose sight of our brief time on the earth. The sukkah also speaks of our frailty while we are here–we are but flesh. One day that will all change. Peter referred to our earthly bodies as tents. We live for only a short while and we must use every opportunity to encourage others toward Jesus Christ and toward His heavenly kingdom.

2 Peter 1:12-14 NKJV
“For this reason I will not be negligent to remind you always of these things, though you know and are established in the present truth. Yes, I think it is right, as long as I am in this tent, to stir you up by reminding you, knowing that shortly I must put off my tent, just as our Lord Jesus Christ showed me”

We should not get so involved with things of the world that it prevents us from moving when God tells us to. The sukkah is a flimsy structure and can be taken down and put up in a very short period of time. It is sensitive to the wind, just as we are to be sensitive to the Holy Spirit.

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